The leadership and human capital minor will deepen students’ knowledge and skills that are necessary to attract, retain, develop, lead, and manage employees. Employees of a firm are resources for an employer and, based on their expertise, provide economic value to a firm. Thus, the effective leadership and management of human capital is instrumental to an organization’s success.

As organizations are seeking new ways of dealing with problems such as globalization, a weak economy, rapidly changing technology, union-management relations, and changing demographics in the workplace, managers and human resources professionals use a wide range of techniques for handling these and other challenges and ensuring that their employees and organizations are competitive and high performing.

Managing human capital is a significant component of the strategic management of an organization. The courses offered in the leadership and human capital minor will expose students to the major issues and challenges in leading and managing a global and increasingly diverse workforce. The courses address the human capital issues all employees face and offer ways to deal with them.

This minor is open to business and nonbusiness majors.

Leadership and Human Capital Minor Curriculum

Below you will find a sample curriculum for the Undergraduate Minor in Leadership and Human Capital. You can find the full set of Leadership and Human Capital Minor requirements in Northeastern’s Course Catalog. Please consult the Course Catalog appropriate to your class year and your academic advisor to ensure your coursework is on track.

Requirements

ORGB 3201. Organizational Behavior. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the actions and behaviors of people in organizations. Uses case studies, videos, experiential exercises, lectures, and discussions to explore the effects of individual, interpersonal, group, organizational, and cross-cultural factors on human behavior. Topics include groups and teams, motivation, leadership, organizational change, organizational culture, structure, conflict resolution, and communication. Both the underlying theories and principles of these topics, as well as their practical applications and implications for organizations, are covered.

or

ORGB 3209. Organizational Behavior. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as ORGB 3201 for business minors only.

MGMT 3420. Managing Human Capital. 4 Hours.

Offers an overview of the human resources management (HRM) function, including recruiting and hiring new employees, overseeing compensation and benefits, improving employee relations, and ensuring compliance with labor laws. Focuses on what a (non-HRM) manager needs to know about HRM and also seeks to provide a foundation for the HRM professional.

Electives

Complete two of the following courses:

MGMT 3302Negotiating in Business
MGMT 3305Power and Influence
MGMT 3315Managing Organizational Change and Disruption
MGMT 3350Managing a Diverse Workforce
MGMT 3380Leading with Character
MGMT 4310The Management Practices of Great Organizations
MGMT 4410Workforce Analytics

Interested? Next Steps

To declare a minor in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business, including as part of the BS in Business Administration and the BS in International Business, students should complete the online minor registration form:

Students will be required to log in using their MyNortheastern credentials. Once the form has been submitted, the student will receive a confirmation email to their husky email account and the student record will be updated within 10-14 business days.

To declare a minor, students must have a 2.0 GPA and be a full-time undergraduate student at Northeastern. To graduate with the minor, students must attain a 2.0 GPA in the courses taken for the minor. No classes for the minor may be taken for a pass/fail grade. The minor is posted on the official transcript within one month of graduation.

Other Minors at D’Amore-McKim

The minor in emerging markets introduces students to the challenges and opportunities that face companies in countries that are rapidly developing into more developed world economies.