Program Details

To earn a Entrepreneurship concentration and MBA, students must complete 16 credits of MBA core curriculum, their corporate residency, and 12 credit hours from the coursework listed below. Full-Time MBA students will also complete 12 credits from a second concentration of their choosing; whereas Full-Time MS in Finance/MBA students will need to complete 24 credits from the finance curriculum. Students in both programs will also complete 15 elective credits—of which 3 must be experiential in nature and 6 will be from courses offered at other schools and colleges at Northeastern to ensure that you graduate prepared to meet the interdisciplinary needs of businesses today.

Required Entrepreneurship MBA Course

Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Dynamic Competition

Explores the life cycle of industries and their effects on the dynamics of competition, including the creation of industries and the role of startups and proliferation of designs; the half-truth of entry timing advantage; design competition, emergence of dominant designs, and implication for firm strategy and industry structure; the onset of maturity: the role of process innovation and incremental product changes; technological discontinuities, challenges for incumbents, and opportunities for new entrants; the hybrid trap and how incumbents often miss the mark during times of industry transformation; the rise of platform disruptions and winner-take-all dynamics; the sociocognitive dimension of industry evolution: product categories and framing; and best practices for managing innovation in startups and established firms. Taught through a combination of cases, vignettes, and interactive lectures.
ENTR 6320 | 3 credits

Complete 9 elective credits from the following:

Introduces major topics in the modern understanding of business models: their essence and role in securing competitive advantage, key components and design of business models, business model change and innovation, technology commercialization through sustaining business models, financial representation of a business model, and validation of developed business models.
ENTR 6218 | 3 credits
Reviews the key theories and tools needed to understand how technological change creates new markets and prompts new business models, how technology-based firms can outcompete rivals in fast-growing markets characterized by high uncertainty, and how the evolution of technology in an industry affects the type of firm capabilities needed to succeed over time.
ENTR 6222 | 3 credits
Offers students an opportunity to analyze whether, why, and how multibusiness corporations expand their operations into new business areas by questioning decisions to grow globally through mechanisms such as acquisitions or alliances. Uses rigorous case-based discussions, expert readings, and major current events to discuss issues related to the choice of make, buy, or partner. Offers students an opportunity to evaluate how these different corporate entrepreneurial strategies are used to help firms be more competitive and innovative.
ENTR 6225 | 3 credits
Uses digital mashups, iterative design, and “play” to unlock creative potential in the way products and services work for customers. Based on the principle that innovation is a discipline that is capable of being learned and being practiced and that arts-based learning and design thinking can unlock creative potential and foster an environment that encourages innovation. A team-based group project applies the principles of iterative design introduced in this course.
ENTR 6293 | 3 credits
Covers qualitative and quantitative aspects of entrepreneurial finance, such as venture capital and angel financing. Also covers private equity (i.e., buyout/leveraged buyout firms) but in less detail. Introduces students to valuation aspects in entrepreneurial finance, including valuation of startups, using real options to value innovation-intensive firms; valuation in staged financing; etc. Case-work emphasizes the practical aspects of qualitative and quantitative issues related to venture capital financing, entrepreneurship, and innovation from the perspective of the financier and the startup firm. Also covers many issues related to the venture capital industry, such as the limited partnership structure of the venture capital/private equity industry, venture capital term sheets and contracts, exit of portfolio firms, and international investments.
FINA 6260 | 3 credits
Examines the specific situation of entrepreneurial marketing. Topics include how to perform a market analysis when there are limited resources and tight schedules to be met. Also addresses new market situations, opportunity assessment, customer segmentation, going to market, and writing a marketing plan.
TECE 6230 | 3 credits
Explores the challenges and processes for harnessing technological innovation for new-business development. Integrates technology strategy, innovation in marketing, product development, and organization design for the purpose of enterprise growth. Through readings, cases, and exercises, studies how firms from different industries gain competitive advantage through distinctive products and services, and leverage their technologies and skills into new emerging markets. Also focuses on processes for conceiving, financing, and organizing new ventures.
ENTR 6230 | 3 credits
Introduces students to the financing process for ventures from early stage to exit. Exposes students to various financing options, which may include crowdsourcing, the American JOBS Act, and foreign-sourced capital, as well as different types of debt and equity financing. Offers students an opportunity to learn about analyzing financial aspects of term sheets, including valuation methodologies and other financing documents.
ENTR 6219 | 3 credits
Introduces the major areas of the legal environment for innovation and new ventures and their relationship to early stage decisions and product and business development. Analyzes the nature, practical impact, and competitive usefulness of laws in the areas of intellectual property, contracts, employment, e-commerce, regulatory compliance, and entity formation. Offers students an opportunity to integrate and apply their understanding of legal, financial, business, technology, and ethical factors; sharpen their analytic skills; and use their skills and understanding to recognize opportunities for adding value and managing risk.
ENTR 6224 | 3 credits
Seeks to develop in-depth knowledge and experience in prototyping by focusing on engineering processes and instrumentation that are used in different industries. Studies the prototyping cycle, from initial process flow and sketching to prototype development to testing and analysis, with an emphasis on iteration. Analyzes how different kinds of engineering prototypes can address design and user-interface needs vs. functional needs, such as looks-like and works-like prototypes. Offers students an opportunity to obtain operating knowledge of methods including 3D printing, SolidWorks, off-the-shelf hardware-software interfaces, simulation, embedded systems, product testing, prototype analysis, and prototype iteration.
GE 5030 | 4 credits
Covers topics specific to managing a business or a strategic business unit within a firm. Considers the special issues related to technology-based firms. Topics include creating a culture, operations planning, staffing for technical excellence, dealing with technology vendors, dealing with advisers, supply chain management, and writing operations plans.
TECE 6300 | 3 credits
Focuses on the main processes needed to develop a complex, high-technology product. Emphasizes the most important techniques and approaches used in a startup environment. Seeks to benefit students of all engineering disciplines including computer science and biomedical, industrial, electrical, mechanical, computer, and chemical engineering. Includes a running practical project in which a new product is designed and executed through a series of small projects for each phase of the product development process. Topics include the product life cycle, new product development processes, project planning and management, new product idea generation, the systems approach to product development, design for manufacturing, market testing and launch, and escalation to manufacturing.
GE 5100 | 4 credits
Designed to provide students with an in-depth exposure to entrepreneurship in the social sector, a rapidly growing segment of the global economy. Uses the case method to expose students to leading entrepreneurs who have developed and implemented business models to solve social problems such as extreme poverty, disease, illiteracy, and economic and social dislocation. Focuses on uniquely creative and driven people who have dedicated their lives to making a difference in the lives of others through values-based entrepreneurship.
ENTR 6214 | 3 credits

The curriculum is subject to change by D’Amore-McKim faculty. Please monitor for updates.

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