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Childcare is not a family issue, it is a business issue. It affects how we work, when we work and for many, why we work. Moving forward, employer-provided child care could also influence where we work. It is up to businesses to think creatively about ways to build the childcare infrastructure we need to help working parents keep working for their families, and the economy as a whole.

The baby formula shortage has left families scrambling to feed their children. Northeastern faculty explain why breastfeeding—or buying breast milk—isn't necessarily an easy solution. Photo by Paul Hennessy/Getty Images

As more health care workers share their testimony from the bedsides of the sick, growing frustration over the sheer number of unvaccinated patients taking up beds has some asking: Can doctors refuse to treat, or decline to see, patients who are unvaccinated? Photo by Tomas Cuesta/Getty Images

Female physicians burn out faster than their male colleagues, according to research by Tim Hoff, professor of management, healthcare systems and health policy at Northeastern. Illustration by Hannah Moore/Northeastern University

Jamie Ladge highlights the urgency of widely available child care to including working parents, especially mothers, in the workforce post-pandemic.

President Biden's infrastructure plan includes child care provisions, which Northeastern ‘shecession' researchers say are essential for welcoming women back to the workforce.

Accommodating remote work trends post-COVID will be a learning curve for workplaces, say Northeastern researchers.

With renewed lockdowns and rising unemployment, reviving economic growth will require increased federal support says Northeastern researchers.

Jamie Ladge's co-authored study examines systemic inequities in the healthcare field and finds that a “hero” status isn't what medical professionals want. Photo: Brian Ach/AP Images for NYC Healthcare Heroes.