News

Even at its most over-the-top moments, the show Succession is a shockingly accurate portrayal of what succession can do to a family business.

Coleman Stucke, DMSB'23, will graduate this summer with a 3.8 grade-point average in business administration in just three years—while starting at forward for the basketball team. 

Nico Nava, MBA'22, is featured in NGN Magazine.

Expect long lines, packed flights and top-dollar tickets if you travel by air this summer, according to travel experts.

Helena D'Alessandro, DMSB'26, co-ops in Greece.

“After two years in the workforce, I knew I wanted to be in the business world and build the skills to become an entrepreneur. Earning an MBA felt like a natural step for me to gain the education, network, and foundational business acumen to succeed in my career as an entrepreneur.” Says Comus Hardman, MBA'22

Sal Lupoli, DMSB'88, owner of Sal's pizza, talks humble beginnings to his 120 location pizza empire.

A team of five Northeastern students, three of which are from D'Amore-McKim, recently won the Southeastern Hedge Fund Competition hosted by Georgia State University in Atlanta on April 27th.

Nearly two years since her evacuation from Afghanistan, Khadija Arian, DMSB'24, is a Northeastern University student, studying finance, learning to audit and heading off to a co-op — all opportunities she wouldn't have had if she hadn't fled when the Taliban took over. She has found friends in her new country and plans to stay. “Northeastern is my home away from home,” Arian says

Research by Juan Bu and Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra shows that new ventures in emerging markets, initially created informally, suffer from costs that persist and constrain a firm's ability to innovate even after they formalize their status. As a result of these informality costs, informally created new ventures are more likely to develop imitative rather than innovative new products. However, being acquired by other firms and improvements in the national innovation system can weaken the persistence of these informality costs, resulting in more innovation. To explain these findings, Bu and Cuervo-Cazurra develop the concept of internal imprinting, which captures how the internal characteristics of a company result in the establishment of practices that persist over time, affecting behavior and innovation. Managers in emerging markets should consider formalizing their firms from the beginning or joining a private business group to mitigate the negative impact of informality on their firms' innovativeness.