Designed For Working Professionals

The Part-Time MS in Finance program provides flexibility for working professionals seeking to brush up on their finance skills and advance in their current roles.

You will take courses with like-minded professionals that will form a strong network for you in the local Finance industry. You will learn from them as they in turn will learn from you through class discussions and projects. You have the opportunity to select electives that match your interest in either corporate finance or investments.

The part-time curriculum features the same required coursework and electives as our full-time cohort but is tailored for working professionals. Part-time students typically take two courses per term to complete the program in 21 months. Classes take place during the evening hours Mondays through Thursdays. Classes begin in September.

“The MS in Finance program allowed me to further my understanding of finance beyond the parameters of my job and also ask the questions that helped me pursue specific interests that I have within finance.”
James Begen, MSF’15


Optional Part-Time MS in Finance Course

Begins with an introduction to the career planning process and to the services of the MBA Career Center. Topics include résumé writing, videotaped practice interviewing, job search strategies, interview preparation, salary negotiation, marketing communication, and visa issues for international students seeking employment in the United States. May include additional topics depending on student interest.
BUSN 6200 | 3 credits

Required Part-Time MS in Finance Courses

Covers the fundamentals of financial decision making. Introduces students to the basic framework of corporate finance. Topics include tools and applications of financial asset valuations, the risk-return tradeoff, modern portfolio theory, methods of calculating the risk of financial assets, tools and applications for analyzing a firm’s capital investment decisions, capital structure and dividend policy issues, theory and evidence concerning corporate restructuring, such as mergers and hostile takeovers, and issues concerning international financial management and the legal, ethical, and regulatory environment of financial management.
FINA 6201 | 3 credits
Introduces the domestic and international financial system and the institutions within it. Develops data and quantitative analysis tools utilized for economic and financial modeling and analysis. Emphasis is on regression analysis and its application, including how to build and interpret statistical models. Topics include the major types of financial institutions that operate within the global economy and the financial instruments employed by them; how exchange rates, interests rates, and security prices are determined and how they affect the global economy; and how governments and central banks impact economic and financial conditions.
FINA 6202 | 3 credits
Familiarizes students with domestic and international financial markets and the securities traded therein. Discusses a variety of techniques for valuation of financial assets and relies heavily on quantitative methods. Critically analyzes such qualitative concepts as market efficiency, intrinsic value, and risk. The contents of this course, descriptive, theoretical, and applied, should provide students with the ability to build unique valuation models to suit the particular investment alternative they wish to scrutinize. Also provides students with an understanding of how investment theory and investment practice relate.
FINA 6203 | 3 credits
Develops specific concepts, policies, and techniques for the financial management of the multinational firm. Topics include operation of the foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange risk management, sources and instruments of international financing, foreign direct investment and the management of political risk, multinational capital budgeting, and financing control systems for the multinational firm.
FINA 6204 | 3 credits
Structures discussion of current topics in the finance literature. Students read and present the works of leading researchers. Topics are broad and may cover various areas of corporate finance, investments, and institutions. Students also complete an original project emphasizing current methodologies of analysis.
FINA 6206 | 3 credits
Develops financial, analytical, and communication skills necessary to develop and implement a financial strategy consistent with firm value creation in a dynamic environment. Stresses the impact of ethical and legal considerations, global markets, and technological innovation on efficient economic outcomes. Emphasizes written and oral communication skills. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to identify and analyze a firm’s strategic opportunities and propose a suitable financial strategy that is consistent with firm value creation.
FINA 6205 | 3 credits

Elective Part-Time MS in Finance Courses

Select 12 credits from the following:

Examines current, specialized, and advanced topics in the areas of corporate finance, investments, risk management, valuation, private equity, venture capital, and other areas as appropriate. Course content, pedagogy, and prerequisites vary by topic and instructor.
FINA 6292 | 3 credits
Offers a summary overview of fintech and how it is disrupting the financial services and insurance industries. Discusses key business, regulatory, and technical elements including, but not limited to, blockchain technologies, bitcoin, crowdsourcing, payment processing, changes in investment management, changes in commercial banking, and changes in insurance. Considers evolutionary changes taking place among incumbents and entrepreneurial startups in developed as well as emerging economies. Includes research articles, business cases, and guest speakers from the local fintech community.
FINA 6231 | 3 credits
Covers qualitative and quantitative aspects of entrepreneurial finance, such as venture capital and angel financing. Also covers private equity (i.e., buyout/leveraged buyout firms) but in less detail. Introduces students to valuation aspects in entrepreneurial finance, including valuation of startups, using real options to value innovation-intensive firms; valuation in staged financing; etc. Case-work emphasizes the practical aspects of qualitative and quantitative issues related to venture capital financing, entrepreneurship, and innovation from the perspective of the financier and the startup firm. Also covers many issues related to the venture capital industry, such as the limited partnership structure of the venture capital/private equity industry, venture capital term sheets and contracts, exit of portfolio firms, and international investments. May be repeated without limit.
FINA 6260 | 3 credits
Provides an overview of all of the hedging markets and hedging instruments. Explores specific hedging use of options, forwards, futures, swaps, and options on futures. Focuses on advanced financial risk management of interest rates, currency rates, equity returns, and fixed income returns. Students use readings and case problems to study when and how to use hedging instruments to alter a portfolio’s risk exposure.
FINA 6211 | 3 credits
Exposes students to theory, applications, and evidence concerning highly sensitive interest rate products. Discusses recent developments in pension fund management, asset/liability management, duration matching, “gap” management, concurrent interest rate and exchange rate management, and other important issues now confronting domestic and international financial and corporate management. Studies how to customize a risk management program.
FINA 6216 | 3 credits
Explores the environments that have recently given rise to a large number of corporate mergers and the business factors underlying these corporate combinations. Examines the financial, managerial, accounting, and legal factors affecting mergers. Studies how to appraise a potential merger and structure a merger on advantageous terms.
FINA 6214 | 3 credits
Develops portfolio construction, revision, and performance measurement. Highlights portfolio construction in an efficient capital market. Topics include risk-return analysis, the effects of diversification on risk reduction, and the costs of inflation, taxes, and transaction costs on fixed income and equity security portfolios. Examines financial models of capital asset pricing as the basis for the analysis of portfolios from the institutional investor’s viewpoint.
FINA 6219 | 3 credits
Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of real estate finance. Emphasizes factors affecting real estate investment. Topics include valuation (appraisal), market analysis, development, taxation, ownership types, short-term financing, mortgage markets, and investment strategies. Designed for students interested in a general overview of real estate finance, as well as those intending to pursue a career in the real-estate field.
FINA 6217 | 3 credits

The curriculum is subject to change by D’Amore-McKim faculty. Please monitor for updates.