The D’Amore-McKim MS in Technological Entrepreneurship offers an immersion in the frameworks and methods needed for successful entrepreneurship.

Whether your aspiration is to launch a new business or create a new business unit for your current employer, the MS in Technological Entrepreneurship is a powerful, compact program that will help you achieve your goals.

This program is offered full-time and part-time. The full-time option is designed for completion in three semesters, from September through June. The part-time option is designed for completion in two calendar years. Students work with their advisors on course sequencing.

The curriculum is 30 credit hours.

Required Courses

Explores the challenges and processes for harnessing technological innovation for new-business development. Integrates technology strategy, innovation in marketing, product development, and organization design for the purpose of enterprise growth. Through readings, cases, and exercises, studies how firms from different industries gain competitive advantage through distinctive products and services, and leverage their technologies and skills into new emerging markets. Also focuses on processes for conceiving, financing, and organizing new ventures.
ENTR 6200 | 3 credits
Covers the role emerging technologies play in innovation for new ventures and established corporations. Includes a mix of theory and practical knowledge. Topics covered include technology disruption, diffusion, life cycles, and research-and-development strategy. Explores, in detail, the technical and market opportunities for current and emerging technologies across a broad spectrum of industries.
TECE 6222 | 3 credits
Examines the specific situation of entrepreneurial marketing. Topics include how to perform a market analysis when there are limited resources and tight schedules to be met. Also addresses new market situations, opportunity assessment, customer segmentation, going to market, and writing a marketing plan.
TECE 6230 | 3 credits
Gives students the opportunity to build a complete business plan for new high-potential ventures. Covers all aspects of the planning process, from the point of view of both the prospective entrepreneur and the potential investor. Explores the demands of the entrepreneurial career through reading, self-assessment exercises, and group projects. Guest speakers from startup companies, law firms, and venture capital firms provide a window on current experiences in the small-business world. Recommended for prospective entrepreneurs as well as others who may become involved with new ventures.
ENTR 6212 | 3 credits
Introduces major topics in the modern understanding of business models: their essence and role in securing competitive advantage, key components and design of business models, business model change and innovation, technology commercialization through sustaining business models, financial representation of a business model, and validation of developed business models.
ENTR 6218 | 3 credits
Covers the intersection of customer research with product design, specifically lean design and how to map abstract attributes that customers seek into concrete product designs that can actually be built. Other topics include managing the technology business interface, creating product teams, and drafting product development plans.
TECE 6250 | 3 credits
Introduces students to the financing process for ventures from early stage to exit. Exposes students to various financing options, which may include crowdsourcing, the American JOBS Act, and foreign-sourced capital, as well as different types of debt and equity financing. Offers students an opportunity to learn about analyzing financial aspects of term sheets, including valuation methodologies and other financing documents.
ENTR 6219 | 3 credits
Covers topics specific to managing a business or a strategic business unit within a firm. Considers the special issues related to technology-based firms. Topics include creating a culture, operations planning, staffing for technical excellence, dealing with technology vendors, dealing with advisers, supply chain management, and writing operations plans.
TECE 6300 | 3 credits
Focuses on the personal skills an entrepreneur needs to lead and persuade others. Students read about and complete exercises on leadership and selling ideas. In addition, students meet members of the entrepreneurship community in New England. Stresses communications skills, both written and oral, along with self-discovery of leadership style.
TECE 6340 | 3 credits

Elective Courses

View elective options in the following areas of study: Accounting, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Finance and Insurance, Human Resources Management, International Business, Managerial Economics, Marketing, Management, Supply Chain Management, Strategy.

The curriculum is subject to change by D’Amore-McKim faculty. Please monitor for updates.

Meaningful Experiential Learning

The integration of academic thinking with authentic, experiential learning is fast becoming the proven method for developing the skills needed to meet today’s business-world demands. No one has greater experience evolving and applying this approach than the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. It’s an approach that empowers our students through expert guest lecturers, learning from classmates with diverse professional experiences, venture accelerator exposure through IDEA, and more. This is the model that will help you become more.

The 360 Huntington Fund launched in 2008 and is now a nearly $1 million student managed mutual fund that represents experiential learning in its purest form.

Starting your own business venture? Work with mentors and access financial, marketing, and communications support. IDEA can help you bring your idea to life. Or, share your expertise by serving as a mentor and earn one credit.

Featured MS in Technological Entrepreneurship Instructors

Tucker Marion

Associate Professor of Technological Entrepreneurship; Entrepreneurship and Innovation Group Chair, Academic Programs

John Friar

Executive Professor of Entrepreneurship

Marc H. Meyer

Robert Shillman Professor of Entrepreneurship; Matthews Distinguished Professor; Co-Director of Northeastern University Center for Entrepreneurship Education

Upon completion of the program, you will have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to demonstrate critical thinking in a business environment.