Program Details

To earn a Leading People and Organizations concentration and MBA, students must complete 16 credits of MBA core curriculum, their corporate residency, and 12 credit hours from the coursework listed below. Full-Time MBA students will also complete 12 credits from a second concentration of their choosing; whereas Full-Time MS in Finance/MBA students will need to complete 24 credits from the finance curriculum. Students in both programs will also complete 15 elective credits—of which 3 must be experiential in nature and 6 will be from courses offered at other schools and colleges at Northeastern to ensure that you graduate prepared to meet the interdisciplinary needs of businesses today.

Select 12 elective credits from the following:

Takes a general manager’s perspective on human resource management. Global competitive challenges are forcing organizations to become increasingly flexible. Workplace trends such as telecommuting, increased information technology, contingent workers, and diversity hiring designed to address this flexibility are fundamentally altering the realm of human resource management in the United States. Explores how these issues affect the management of people in organizations through case analyses, small-group exercises, videos, and lectures. Examines topics traditionally related to the human resources management function, such as planning, staffing, evaluating, and rewarding. Also examines employee rights, labor relations, and international human resources management.
HRMG 6214 | 3 credits
Seeks to help students build the cross-cultural skills necessary to comfortably and effectively work in different cultures and with people from different cultures. Discusses the alignment between the firm’s business strategy and the leader’s responses in a multicultural environment along with the methods for leadership effectiveness in multicultural teams and virtual environments. Using online, experiential, and discussion-based methods, offers students an opportunity to gain the self-awareness needed to generate a plan for their own global leadership development.
INTB 6226 | 3 credits
Examines the actions that managers must take to stimulate innovation and direct it in ways that allow the organization to accomplish its goals. Topics include what organization forms are most conducive to innovation, what factors hinder innovativeness and how can they be overcome, and what role managers play in bringing about innovation. Focuses on the actions that companies and their managers can take to design their organizations and systems effectively in order to foster innovativeness. Elements of an organization’s infrastructure include design, reward mechanisms, communication patterns, boundary spanning, control systems, leadership at all levels, and the organization’s culture.
HRMG 6212 | 3 credits
Examines the actions that managers must take to stimulate innovation and direct it in ways that allow the organization to accomplish its goals. Topics include what organization forms are most conducive to innovation, what factors hinder innovativeness and how can they be overcome, and what role managers play in bringing about innovation. Focuses on the actions that companies and their managers can take to design their organizations and systems effectively in order to foster innovativeness. Elements of an organization’s infrastructure include design, reward mechanisms, communication patterns, boundary spanning, control systems, leadership at all levels, and the organization’s culture.
HRMG 6223 | 3 credits
Studies and debates the criteria for a great company. As suppliers, customers, employees, or students, everyone has experience with a range of organizations. Some are admired, some are mediocre, and some are dreadful. This course focuses on companies with management practices that produce and sustain extraordinary outcomes such as low cost, amazing service, fast growth, and exceptional quality. Often, these companies are great because they dare to be different and the key question is: “How do they do it?” Explores such topics as organizational culture, organizational design, empowerment, business process improvement, reward systems, and employee and organizational learning. Uses a variety of learning approaches, including case studies, articles, lecture/discussion, videos, and exercises.
HRMG 6218 | 3 credits
Built on the premise that everyone is capable of leadership. Exposes students to a series of alternative perspectives of leadership, including some contemporary collaborative models. From careful consideration of these perspectives, as well as from practicing them using the course’s experiential methods, students have an opportunity to build a personal model of leadership upon which they can expand as they continue to develop as leaders.
HRMG 6213 | 3 credits
Explores how organizational leaders use scientific knowledge to develop effective sustainability strategies around such global issues as climate change and energy depletion. Also explores how key stakeholders—businesses, governments, gray sector organizations, and communities—interact on issues of global sustainability. The course objective is to develop leaders who can research and communicate effectively about global environmental sustainability.
HRMG 6219 | 3 credits
Examines issues related to managing oneself and others in an increasingly diverse workforce. Organizations need to address diversity issues in some manner if they are to compete effectively in a global economy. Covers diversity-related issues with management implications including religion, social identity, socialization, employment decisions by applicants and organizations, team dynamics, leadership, sexual harassment, workplace romance, career development, work and family, accommodation of people with disabilities, and organizational strategies for promoting equal opportunity and a multicultural approach toward diversity. Offers students an opportunity to conduct self-assessments to monitor their own workforce needs as they relate to issues of diversity, careers, and work-life integration.
MGMT 3350 | 3 credits
Designed to improve the managerial and leadership effectiveness of individuals who have increasing responsibility over the performance of creative individual contributors and project teams working for them. Covers both micro concerns (individuals and groups) and macro issues (organizational structure and interfunctional relationships). Topics include creating and sustaining the motivational commitment and performance of professional employees, dealing with complacency and routine performance, managing organizational reward systems and career paths of professionals, overseeing effective conflict management and leadership of decision-making processes, managing pressures between product development and schedule, staffing and managing the critical roles and cross-functional relationships in the innovation process, managing the communication and transfer of information and technology effectively across organizational structures, and effecting organizational diagnosis for systemic change.
HRMG 6210 | 3 credits
Designed to improve students’ understanding of the negotiations process and their ability to plan and conduct negotiations effectively. Includes such class activities as readings, lectures, and discussions as well as case discussions and role-playing negotiation exercises.
MGMT 6214 | 3 credits
Introduces students to the uses of power and influence in the surroundings in which they work, working with and managing people, and achieving the goals they set for themselves. Offers students an opportunity to make sense of their own on-the-job learning experiences and to explore basic diagnostic and action-planning skills that they can later use on the job. Exposes students to a variety of cases that demonstrate the effective and ineffective uses of power in different types of organizational contexts and at different points in a manager’s career and how to consider difficult ethical questions as well.
HRMG 6221 | 3 credits
Introduces how to measure and manage a workforce strategically, including (1) identifying the strategic work that is truly necessary to execute firm strategy; (2) investing in differentiated management systems that support that work; and (3) designing and implementing targeted measurement systems, such as human resources function and workforce scorecards, designed to help to hold line managers accountable for strategic talent. Emphasizes helping students move from a focus on levels associated with a particular workforce attribute (e.g., what is our cost per hire?) to understanding the impact of the workforce on business-level outcomes (e.g., how might an increase in the quality of our project managers affect new product cycle time?).
STRT 6210 | 3 credits

*Students may only select one of these courses.

The curriculum is subject to change by D’Amore-McKim faculty. Please monitor for updates.

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