Curriculum Options

As a Graduate Certificate student, you will have the opportunity to learn from world-renowned faculty and accomplished classmates. Among your professors, you’ll find the founders of tech start-ups, innovative change agents, consultants, and respected industry leaders. Sitting beside you in the classroom, you’ll find fellow students from around the world, ready to share their own professional and academic experience. Engage in practical, real-world learning, designed for ambitious professionals like you.

A Focused Curriculum to Target Your Goals

By mastering the curriculum in this graduate certificate, you will gain valuable insight to help you succeed when faced with real-world challenges.

Each of the classes for your Graduate Certificate in Innovation Management will help you gain essential business knowledge to develop your career potential. This program was designed to be F1 visa compliant. For International students, you will take 5 classes over an 8-month period (two semesters) to be visa compliant.

Required Course

Explores the challenges and processes for harnessing technological innovation for new-business development. Integrates technology strategy, innovation in marketing, product development, and organization design for the purpose of enterprise growth. Through readings, cases, and exercises, studies how firms from different industries gain competitive advantage through distinctive products and services, and leverage their technologies and skills into new emerging markets. Also focuses on processes for conceiving, financing, and organizing new ventures.
ENTR 6200 | 3 credits

Elective Courses (Select 3 to 4)

Course offerings vary each semester.

Gives students the opportunity to build a complete business plan for new high-potential ventures. Covers all aspects of the planning process, from the point of view of both the prospective entrepreneur and the potential investor. Explores the demands of the entrepreneurial career through reading, self-assessment exercises, and group projects. Guest speakers from startup companies, law firms, and venture capital firms provide a window on current experiences in the small-business world. Recommended for prospective entrepreneurs as well as others who may become involved with new ventures.
ENTR 6212 | 3 credits
Designed to provide students with an in-depth exposure to entrepreneurship in the social sector, a rapidly growing segment of the global economy. Uses the case method to expose students to leading entrepreneurs who have developed and implemented business models to solve social problems such as extreme poverty, disease, illiteracy, and economic and social dislocation. Focuses on uniquely creative and driven people who have dedicated their lives to making a difference in the lives of others through values-based entrepreneurship.
ENTR 6214 | 3 credits
Introduces major topics in the modern understanding of business models: their essence and role in securing competitive advantage, key components and design of business models, business model change and innovation, technology commercialization through sustaining business models, financial representation of a business model, and validation of developed business models.
ENTR 6218 | 3 credits
Explores the unique challenges and strengths of family firms. Uses a learning framework with particular emphasis upon the insights and lessons learned by successful family business leaders. Offers students an opportunity to heighten their awareness of themselves concerning their roles in the family firm and their future career plans, as well as to develop key leadership skills associated with strategic planning and implantation within family enterprises. Explores particular functional issues unique to family firms in the areas of marketing, finance, control and human resource management, as well as family and business governance.
ENTR 6220 | 3 credits
Reviews the key theories and tools needed to understand how technological change creates new markets and prompts new business models, how technology-based firms can outcompete rivals in fast-growing markets characterized by high uncertainty, and how the evolution of technology in an industry affects the type of firm capabilities needed to succeed over time.
ENTR 6222 | 3 credits
Introduces the major areas of the legal environment for innovation and new ventures and their relationship to early stage decisions and product and business development. Analyzes the nature, practical impact, and competitive usefulness of laws in the areas of intellectual property, contracts, employment, e-commerce, regulatory compliance, and entity formation. Offers students an opportunity to integrate and apply their understanding of legal, financial, business, technology, and ethical factors; sharpen their analytic skills; and use their skills and understanding to recognize opportunities for adding value and managing risk.
ENTR 6224 | 3 credits
Offers students an opportunity to analyze whether, why, and how multibusiness corporations expand their operations into new business areas by questioning decisions to grow globally through mechanisms such as acquisitions or alliances. Uses rigorous case-based discussions, expert readings, and major current events to discuss issues related to the choice of make, buy, or partner. Offers students an opportunity to evaluate how these different corporate entrepreneurial strategies are used to help firms be more competitive and innovative. 
ENTR 6225 | 3 credits
Uses digital mashups, iterative design, and “play” to unlock creative potential in the way products and services work for customers. Based on the principle that innovation is a discipline that is capable of being learned and being practiced and that arts-based learning and design thinking can unlock creative potential and foster an environment that encourages innovation. A team-based group project applies the principles of iterative design introduced in this course.
ENTR 6293 | 3 credits
Covers the legal environment in which businesses operate and its impact on businesses and their transactions. Exposes students to a variety of legal concepts and topics, such as corporations and other legal entities; contract law, mergers and acquisitions, e-commerce, and other types of business transactions; intellectual property; compliance with securities, consumer products, and other regulations; debtor-creditor relations, employment, and agency law; torts and strict liability; and the international legal environment. Addresses the complementary application of legal, financial, business, and ethical analysis to business management and decision making. Offers students an opportunity to sharpen their analytical and critical thinking skills, to develop a manager’s understanding of laws and the legal system, and to use those skills and understanding to create opportunities for adding value and managing risk.
MGMT 6210 | 3 credits
Focuses on the challenges and decisions new-product managers face as they take ideas through the new-product-development process. Companies need to create, develop, and market new products and services continually to compete effectively in a rapidly changing environment. Provides an overview of the new-product-development process, with an emphasis on customer involvement in this process. Provides detailed insights on such topics as new-product strategy, idea generation, idea selection and evaluation, concept development and testing, product development and testing, and market testing.
MKTG 6214 | 3 credits
Covers the role emerging technologies play in innovation for new ventures and established corporations. Includes a mix of theory and practical knowledge. Topics covered include technology disruption, diffusion, life cycles, and research-and-development strategy. Explores, in detail, the technical and market opportunities for current and emerging technologies across a broad spectrum of industries.
TECE 6222 | 3 credits
Examines the specific situation of entrepreneurial marketing. Topics include how to perform a market analysis when there are limited resources and tight schedules to be met. Also addresses new market situations, opportunity assessment, customer segmentation, going to market, and writing a marketing plan.
TECE 6230 | 3 credits
Covers the intersection of customer research with product design, specifically lean design and how to map abstract attributes that customers seek into concrete product designs that can actually be built. Other topics include managing the technology business interface, creating product teams, and drafting product development plans. 
TECE 6250 | 3 credits
Covers topics specific to managing a business or a strategic business unit within a firm. Considers the special issues related to technology-based firms. Topics include creating a culture, operations planning, staffing for technical excellence, dealing with technology vendors, dealing with advisers, supply chain management, and writing operations plans. 
TECE 6300 | 3 credits
Focuses on the personal skills an entrepreneur needs to lead and persuade others. Students read about and complete exercises on leadership and selling ideas. In addition, students meet members of the entrepreneurship community in New England. Stresses communications skills, both written and oral, along with self-discovery of leadership style.
TECE 6340 | 3 credits

Experiential Learning Opportunities

International students who successfully complete a 15-credit certificate on campus are eligible to apply for OPT work authorization. Apply your classroom learning to real-world work experience.

Starting your own business venture? Work with mentors and access financial, marketing, and communications support. IDEA can help you bring your idea to life. Or, share your expertise by serving as a mentor and earn one credit.

Join fellow students and professionals with an interest in entrepreneurship to collaboratively develop a new business plan. Learn and network with this club.

Featured Graduate Certificate Instructors

Martin Dias

Associate Teaching Professor, Supply Chain Information Management

Tucker Marion

Associate Professor of Technological Entrepreneurship; Entrepreneurship and Innovation Group Chair, Academic Programs

See all faculty who regularly teaching in our Graduate Certificate programs.