Boston Campus Curriculum

As a graduate certificate student, you will have the opportunity to learn from world-renowned faculty and accomplished classmates. Among your professors, you’ll find chief financial officers, turnaround experts, consultants, and respected industry leaders. Sitting beside you in the classroom, you’ll find fellow students from around the world, ready to share their own professional and academic experience. Engage in practical, real-world learning, designed for ambitious professionals like you.

Open to both U.S. and international students, this option is perfect for professionals with the drive to dedicate four months full-time or eight (or more) months part-time to this educational experience. This program has been designed to be compliant with F1 visa regulations.

Program Details

A Graduate Certificate in Corporate Renewal is an opportunity to take control of your career. Let us help you.

In this short program, consisting of four or five graduate level courses, you will develop foundational financial knowledge. Your coursework will introduce methods of implementing financial strategy by stressing the impact of ethical and legal considerations. You may also choose through your elective courses to examine the financial, managerial, accounting, and legal factors affecting corporate mergers or explore advanced financial risk management.

The curriculum is subject to change by D’Amore-McKim faculty. Please monitor for updates.

Required Courses (Select 1)

Highlights the role of financial management as a source of value creation in a competitive global environment characterized by rapid technological, personal, and market changes. Offers students an opportunity to develop tools and techniques of financial analysis and valuation to support financial decision making. Presents future managers with actual business problems to learn to apply the tools of financial analysis to strategic decisions faced by the firm, such as capital budgeting and capital structure.
FINA 6200 | 3 credits
Focuses on marketing analysis and planning. Emphasizes analysis of customer needs and company and competitor capabilities. This analysis forms the basis of a sound marketing strategy that provides value to customers in a way superior to competitors. Discusses how to deliver this strategy through the development of an integrated marketing program covering product offerings, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Includes professional accounting students.
MKTG 6200 | 3 credits
Examines today’s evolving environment, in which effective utilization of human resources is a source of competitive advantage. To maximize the contribution of organizational members, managers must be able to understand, diagnose, and influence workplace behavior in the context of change. Topics include management of cross-functional teams and boundaryless organizations. Emphasis is on the role of corporate culture and distributed leadership.
HRMG 6200 | 3 credits

Electives (Select 3 or 4)

Concentrates on the diagnosis, prescription, and implementation of actions pertinent to business turnarounds, troubled companies, workouts, bankruptcies, and liquidations. Case studies and readings guide the student through the maze of financial, ethical, legal, general business, and strategic aspects of turnarounds, culminating in the student evaluating and developing a turnaround plan. 
FINA 6215 | 3 credits
Explores recent developments in financial management and financial analysis through the use of modern finance theory to make capital allocation decisions that lead to long-run value maximization for the corporation. Focuses on applications and financial model building, risk analysis for valuation applications, and business strategies to measure and manage corporate value and value creation. Topics are relevant to value consultants, corporate managers, and securities analysts.
FINA 6216 | 3 credits
Focuses on the challenges and decisions new-product managers face as they take ideas through the new-product-development process. Companies need to create, develop, and market new products and services continually to compete effectively in a rapidly changing environment. Provides an overview of the new-product-development process, with an emphasis on customer involvement in this process. Provides detailed insights on such topics as new-product strategy, idea generation, idea selection and evaluation, concept development and testing, product development and testing, and market testing.
MKTG 6214 | 3 credits
Offers an advanced course in defining and managing an organization’s product-market strategy. Intended for marketing specialists and nonspecialists interested in incorporating a market focus from a general management or consulting perspective. Emphasizes using market information to choose and manage the company’s relationships with customers and competitors in a complex, changing environment, as well as the practical concerns of implementing and evaluating marketing strategy.
MKTG 6216 | 3 credits
Examines the actions that managers must take to stimulate innovation and direct it in ways that allow the organization to accomplish its goals. Topics include what organization forms are most conducive to innovation, what factors hinder innovativeness and how can they be overcome, and what role managers play in bringing about innovation. Focuses on the actions that companies and their managers can take to design their organizations and systems effectively in order to foster innovativeness. Elements of an organization’s infrastructure include design, reward mechanisms, communication patterns, boundary spanning, control systems, leadership at all levels, and the organization’s culture. 
HRMG 6212 | 3 credits
Designed to improve students’ understanding of the negotiations process and their ability to plan and conduct negotiations effectively. Includes such class activities as readings, lectures, and discussions as well as case discussions and role-playing negotiation exercises.
MGMT 6214 | 3 credits
Studies and debates the criteria for a great company. As suppliers, customers, employees, or students, everyone has experience with a range of organizations. Some are admired, some are mediocre, and some are dreadful. This course focuses on companies with management practices that produce and sustain extraordinary outcomes such as low cost, amazing service, fast growth, and exceptional quality. Often, these companies are great because they dare to be different and the key question is: “How do they do it?” Explores such topics as organizational culture, organizational design, empowerment, business process improvement, reward systems, and employee and organizational learning. Uses a variety of learning approaches, including case studies, articles, lecture/discussion, videos, and exercises.
HRMG 6218 | 3 credits
Designed to provide students with an in-depth exposure to entrepreneurship in the social sector, a rapidly growing segment of the global economy. Uses the case method to expose students to leading entrepreneurs who have developed and implemented business models to solve social problems such as extreme poverty, disease, illiteracy, and economic and social dislocation. Focuses on uniquely creative and driven people who have dedicated their lives to making a difference in the lives of others through values-based entrepreneurship.
ENTR 6214 | 3 credits