Online Curriculum

Northeastern University’s Online Graduate Certificate in Business Administration is an advanced business program composed of four courses of three credit hours each.

Build towards something bigger. If you’re interested in earning a higher degree, you may be able to apply credit for any course in which you earn a B or better to our Online MBA (pending acceptance). It’s the perfect way to use your career-enhancing certificate for a more profound professional transformation.

Program Features

  • Customizable schedule and curriculum
  • Flexible online format for working professionals
  • Leverage our focus on professional experience—GRE/GMAT not required for admissions

Why Should You Consider This Certificate?

  • Continue your education with an acclaimed and accredited school of business
  • Customize your graduate-level learning experience by selecting courses for your certificate from our Online MBA program
  • 9 entry terms per year allows you to begin the program at a time that fits with your life and career

Program Details

Select 12 credit hours from the following:

Provides students with basic information analysis skills and tools needed to manage effectively in today’s information-intensive business climate. Exposes students to analytical problems from different areas of business and the quantitative concepts and techniques that can analyze them. Course objectives are to improve the information analysis skills of the students, to provide students with a working knowledge of important statistical tools, to help students become more critical evaluators of studies and reports involving statistical and quantitative methods, and to improve skills in communicating the results of analyses. Offers students the opportunity to learn how to evaluate, analyze, and interpret data, and present their findings and conclusions that will be most useful for managerial decision making through the use of business applications and analytical software.
MGSC 6200 | 3 credits
Focuses on issues of the strategic uses of information technology for competitive advantage, support of business processes, information and control, digital business, integration of business with technology, organizational communication, and data management. Information has become a key resource in doing business. Managers must understand that high-quality information adds value to existing products and services, enhances the creation of new products, changes the efficiency and effectiveness of business processes, and affects relationships with customers, suppliers, and competitors.
MGSC 6204 | 1.5 credits
Examines today’s evolving environment, in which effective utilization of human resources is a source of competitive advantage. To maximize the contribution of organizational members, managers must be able to understand, diagnose, and influence workplace behavior in the context of change. Topics include management of cross-functional teams and boundaryless organizations. Emphasis is on the role of corporate culture and distributed leadership.
HRMG 6200 | 3 credits
Highlights the role of financial management as a source of value creation in a competitive global environment characterized by rapid technological, personal, and market changes. Offers students an opportunity to develop tools and techniques of financial analysis and valuation to support financial decision making. Presents future managers with actual business problems to learn to apply the tools of financial analysis to strategic decisions faced by the firm, such as capital budgeting and capital structure.
FINA 6200 | 3 credits
Offers students an opportunity to understand how to prepare corporate financial reports and utilize critical information in these reports to improve business decision making. Introduces contemporary methods of financial statement analysis used by internal decision makers and external capital providers.
ACCT 6272 | 2.25 credits
Focuses on developing and analyzing accounting information to identify strategic implications and, using that information, to make effective decisions in various business functions that must work together for overall strategic success. Introduces key management accounting concepts and techniques, including the impact of different cost behaviors, activity-based costing, evaluating profitability of products and customers, flexible budgeting, and variance analysis. Offers students an opportunity to learn to use the data they develop to think objectively about the business, to ascertain why a situation occurs, to identify the implications of data for management decisions, and to use the data to discover strategically important opportunities and challenges.
ACCT 6273 | 2.25 credits
Familiarizes students with domestic and international financial markets and the securities traded therein. Discusses a variety of techniques for valuation of financial assets and relies heavily on quantitative methods. Critically analyzes such qualitative concepts as market efficiency, intrinsic value, and risk. The contents of this course, descriptive, theoretical, and applied, should provide students with the ability to build unique valuation models to suit the particular investment alternative they wish to scrutinize. Also provides students with an understanding of how investment theory and investment practice relate.
FINA 6203 | 3 credits
Develops specific concepts, policies, and techniques for the financial management of the multinational firm. Topics include operation of the foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange risk management, sources and instruments of international financing, foreign direct investment and the management of political risk, multinational capital budgeting, and financing control systems for the multinational firm.
FINA 6204 | 3 credits
Develops financial, analytical, and communication skills necessary to develop and implement a financial strategy consistent with firm value creation in a dynamic environment. Stresses the impact of ethical and legal considerations, global markets, and technological innovation on efficient economic outcomes. Emphasizes written and oral communication skills. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to identify and analyze a firm’s strategic opportunities and propose a suitable financial strategy that is consistent with firm value creation.
FINA 6205 | 3 credits
Provides an overview of all of the hedging markets and hedging instruments. Explores specific hedging use of options, forwards, futures, swaps, and options on futures. Focuses on advanced financial risk management of interest rates, currency rates, equity returns, and fixed income returns. Students use readings and case problems to study when and how to use hedging instruments to alter a portfolio’s risk exposure.
FINA 6211 | 3 credits
Discusses policy, strategy, and administration of financial services firms. Topics include issuance of securities, the service function within financial services, pricing a negotiated issue of common stock or competitive bid issue, and meeting capital requirements of a securities firm.
FINA 6213 | 3 credits
Explores the environments that have recently given rise to a large number of corporate mergers and the business factors underlying these corporate combinations. Examines the financial, managerial, accounting, and legal factors affecting mergers. Studies how to appraise a potential merger and structure a merger on advantageous terms.
FINA 6214 | 3 credits
Concentrates on the diagnosis, prescription, and implementation of actions pertinent to business turnarounds, troubled companies, workouts, bankruptcies, and liquidations. Case studies and readings guide the student through the maze of financial, ethical, legal, general business, and strategic aspects of turnarounds, culminating in the student evaluating and developing a turnaround plan.
FINA 6215 | 3 credits
Explores recent developments in financial management and financial analysis through the use of modern finance theory to make capital allocation decisions that lead to long-run value maximization for the corporation. Focuses on applications and financial model building, risk analysis for valuation applications, and business strategies to measure and manage corporate value and value creation. Topics are relevant to value consultants, corporate managers, and securities analysts.
FINA 6216 | 3 Credits
Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of real estate finance. Emphasizes factors affecting real estate investment. Topics include valuation (appraisal), market analysis, development, taxation, ownership types, short-term financing, mortgage markets, and investment strategies. Designed for students interested in a general overview of real estate finance, as well as those intending to pursue a career in the real-estate field.
FINA 6217 | 3 credits
Examines the idea that building a sustainable business enterprise often involves correcting market failures. Examines the responsibilities of the business enterprise to society at large. Also explores the causes of and remedies for market failures, such as immigration, education, healthcare, climate change, and finance, and what these mean for governments, businesses, and individuals.
MECN 6205 | 3 credits
Covers the issues surrounding the creation of a new business in the service and retail sectors. Emphasizes issues relating to the startup, growth, and operation of business ventures in these areas. Topics include developing a business plan for startup, market positioning, services design, operations management, sales forecasting, cash flow management, and venture financing with a heavy emphasis on debt financing. Students are asked to develop business plans for services and retail ventures of their own choosing as the class project. Requires prior completion of 9 SH of MBA core courses.
ENTR 6211 | 3 credits
Explores using innovation to build and create value in the larger global context. Examines some of the latest innovation practices: (1) to build and create value within emerging economies, (2) to facilitate social entrepreneurship, (3) to promote sustainable development, and (4) to build and create value at the bottom of the pyramid. Exposes students to what successful entrepreneurs must learn to balance business demands with the larger need for innovative thinking. Stresses the application of successful practices to generate results. Topics include creating and sharing knowledge and intellectual property, exploiting systems and networks, redefining disruptive innovation, and the steps necessary to make innovation and entrepreneurship happen in a variety of global contexts. Uses real-life examples and case studies to illustrate successful practices.
ENTR 6216 | 3 credits
Explores the challenges and processes for harnessing technological innovation for new-business development. Integrates technology strategy, innovation in marketing, product development, and organization design for the purpose of enterprise growth. Through readings, cases, and exercises, studies how firms from different industries gain competitive advantage through distinctive products and services, and leverage their technologies and skills into new emerging markets. Also focuses on processes for conceiving, financing, and organizing new ventures.
ENTR 6200 | 3 credits
Gives students the opportunity to build a complete business plan for new high-potential ventures. Covers all aspects of the planning process, from the point of view of both the prospective entrepreneur and the potential investor. Explores the demands of the entrepreneurial career through reading, self-assessment exercises, and group projects. Guest speakers from startup companies, law firms, and venture capital firms provide a window on current experiences in the small-business world. Recommended for prospective entrepreneurs as well as others who may become involved with new ventures.
ENTR 6212 | 3 credits
Stresses the operating problems of managing small businesses. Case studies develop analytical approaches for appraising the risks and rewards of potential growth opportunities as well as operating problems. Problems range from locating, evaluating, marketing, and financing a small company to the survival and growth of more established businesses. Guest speakers and entrepreneurs provide pertinent business perspectives to in-class activities.
ENTR 6210 | 3 credits
Develops understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing the international marketing executive, the decision-making process in marketing goods abroad, and the environmental forces—economic, cultural, and political—affecting the marketing process in the international marketplace.
MKTG 6212 | 3 credits
Trains managers to understand the competitive implications of global economic policies, the business effects of technological change, and the commercial imperatives of alternative political systems at a macro level. At a micro level, it creates a framework for industry analysis in a global setting that combines economic analysis, competitive analysis, and business decision-making skills.
MECN 6200 | 3 credits
Focuses on marketing analysis and planning. Emphasizes analysis of customer needs and company and competitor capabilities. This analysis forms the basis of a sound marketing strategy that provides value to customers in a way superior to competitors. Discusses how to deliver this strategy through the development of an intergrated marketing program covering product offerings, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Includes professional accounting students.
MKTG 6200 | 3 credits
Provides an overview of the major qualitative and quantitative marketing research methodologies available to marketing managers. Explores customer relationship management (CRM) and multivariate statistical techniques including conjoint analysis, customer satisfaction, and service quality measurement.
MKTG 6210 | 3 credits
Focuses on the challenges and decisions new-product managers face as they take ideas through the new-product-development process. Companies need to create, develop, and market new products and services continually to compete effectively in a rapidly changing environment. Provides an overview of the new-product-development process, with an emphasis on customer involvement in this process. Provides detailed insights on such topics as new-product strategy, idea generation, idea selection and evaluation, concept development and testing, product development and testing, and market testing.
MKTG 6214 | 3 credits
Offers an advanced course in defining and managing an organization’s product-market strategy. Intended for marketing specialists and nonspecialists interested in incorporating a market focus from a general management or consulting perspective. Emphasizes using market information to choose and manage the company’s relationships with customers and competitors in a complex, changing environment, as well as the practical concerns of implementing and evaluating marketing strategy.
MKTG 6216 | 3 credits
Provides students with knowledge of management needs and techniques associated with the service sector of the economy. Includes understanding the differences between goods and service marketing, and how these differences influence marketing strategy and the tactical design of marketing mix variables. Assists in understanding the difference between tangible goods and services, differences in the consumer evaluation process between goods and services, special marketing problems created by the differences between goods and services, and strategies that address the unique problems in service marketing.
MKTG 6218 | 3 credits
Explores the latest trends in technology and new media, their effect on marketing goods and services, and how to deliver value to the customer using the latest technological innovations. Examines the latest trends in digital marketing, such as mobile marketing, and how the mobile platform can be used for branding purposes and to enhance customer relationships. Explores topics such as branding and advertising via mobile phones, online social networks and communities, technology adoption in global emerging markets, and how the Internet empowers customers and enables firms to engage in customer advocacy. Also examines how marketing research is conducted for technological innovations and ethical concerns that arise with technology usage, such as privacy and security issues, identity theft, and the role of trust in digital marketing.
MKTG 6222 | 3 credits
Offers students an opportunity to obtain an in-depth understanding of the brand-building process amid radical changes in today’s marketing communications platforms. Exposes students to concepts, frameworks, and theories critical to developing branding and advertising strategy in the twenty-first century, including brand positioning, target audiences definition, creative advertising, integrated marketing communications, the influence of social media, and assessing marketing and media effectiveness.
MKTG 6223 | 3 credits
Develops understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing the international marketing executive, the decision-making process in marketing goods abroad, and the environmental forces—economic, cultural, and political—affecting the marketing process in the international marketplace.
MKTG 6212 | 3 credits
Examines the evolution of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from early forms of organized institutional care through the current dynamic and increasingly integrated and managed care systems. Introduces students to the interactions of regulatory, economic, political, and social aspects of the healthcare system. Compares current policies and proposals for health reform. Students are asked to analyze the impact and consequences of actions in one era on the structure and function of healthcare practice in later years and to project these trends into the future.
MGMT 6222 | 3 credits
Examines how healthcare organizations manage their resources and competitive environment to meet the goals of their many stakeholders. Applies three essential elements of strategic decision making—environmental analysis, strategic formulation, and strategy implementation—to the healthcare industry.
MGMT 6223 | 3 credits
Examines how organizational leaders influence decisions to advance an environmental agenda. Studies the scientific knowledge that organizational leaders must have to make effective sustainability decisions. Analyzes how a variety of organizations, including businesses, governments, government-sponsored enterprises, and nongovernment organizations, interact on environmental issues.
MGMT 6225 | 3 credits
Examines how the environment affects corporate strategy, public policy, and individual decision making. Exposes students to the skills and knowledge needed to help organizations understand and act upon the principles of sustainability. Examines a variety of environmental problems, including global warming, use and disposal of toxic substances, and depletion of natural resources. Also studies how companies solve these problems by reducing their impact on the environment through solutions such as zero emissions, green design, and corporate environmental reporting.
MGMT 6226 | 3 credits
Covers the fundamentals for business law and contracts, structures and processes for corporate governance, and approaches to risk mitigation. Explores the development, protection, and management of intellectual property across a variety of industry sectors and how such protections work or do not work in emerging markets. Exposes students to the intersection of law, business, and innovation.
MGMT 6283 | 3 credits
Introduces the history and current status of information systems in healthcare: information architectures, administrative and clinical applications, evidence-based medicine, information retrieval, decision support systems, security and confidentiality, bioinformatics, information system cycles, the electronic health record, key health information systems and standards, and medical devices.
MGSC 6221 | 3 credits
Focuses on the international business environment, and examines the influence on global decision making of such areas as the international economy and trade issues, legal and political context differences, governmental actions, cultural and ethical system differences, exchange rates and international currency markets, international institutions like the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund, and regional agreements like the European Union, NAFTA, and Mercosur. Also analyzes why firms internationalize their operations, how they can internationalize, and key areas such as international manufacturing, marketing, human resource management, and strategy.
INTB 6200 | 3 credits
Focuses on issues that arise when a firm operates in multiple countries with cultures that are different from its home country. Principally addresses the perspectives of U.S. firms operating overseas, but also explores other national firms operating in the United States and in third-country environments. A central issue is how corporate cultures evolve in the context of national cultures.
INTB 6212 | 3 credits
Offers students an opportunity to learn about how companies overcome the barriers to managing global new-product development. Studies how distance, along with differences in culture, capabilities, costs, and customers, make the task of managing global new-product development efforts incredibly difficult and delicate. Also studies how firms develop and execute global innovation strategies, build and leverage global networks, create R&D capabilities abroad, manage distributed projects and virtual teams, and how emerging market firms innovate globally.
INTB 6217 | 3 credits
Offers an opportunity to learn how to build and lead different types of teams, including co-located, virtual, global, and top management teams. Asks students to identify the roles and responsibilities of team members and leaders and to develop effective communication, collaboration, and commitment among team members and other constituencies. Also examines how to effectively facilitate coordination across functionally distinct teams.
HRMG 6217 | 3 credits
Focuses on the managerial activities of those involved in supply chain management operations and planning for companies involved in international commerce. Analyzes contemporary issues that affect the design of international supply chain systems and strategies, including sourcing, logistics, transactions, risk, and ethical considerations. Examines the current status and future prospects of the modes of international logistics operations as well as international trade and development issues, not only from the corporate perspective but also in terms of government policy.
SCHM 6213 | 3 credits
Examines the logistics and transportation operations, including the structure, challenges, and potential of the major modes of domestic transportation. Focuses on the interaction between logistics providers and shippers in the marketplace. Explores the major dynamics of the logistics marketplace and their impact on supply chain management. Offers students a managerial perspective on controlling what is typically the most expensive component of supply chain management, transportation expenditures.
SCHM 6211 | 3 credits
Focuses on the integrative management of processes and activities involved in transformation and delivery of goods and services. Offers students an opportunity to obtain foundational knowledge on operations and supply chain management concepts, techniques, and functions. Topics covered include sourcing and procurement, manufacturing and service operations, process design and control, quality management, capacity planning, demand planning and forecasting, inventory management, transportation and distribution management, interfirm relationship management, and attendant information flows.
SCHM 6201 | 3 credits
Addresses the strategic and operational role of sourcing and procurement and its impact on the supply chain as it relates to the entire organization. The selection, contracting, development, and monitoring/managing of the right supplier in the right location is more often a source of competitive advantage and a major contributor to a company’s bottom line. Focuses on a variety of aspects of this function—strategy development, organization, procedures, supplier selection, negotiations, buyer-supplier relationship management, quantity, quality, timeliness, and cost/price considerations for the purchase of goods and services. Emphasizes the perspective of the sourcing and procurement manager. The key questions addressed in this course are: What does the manager need to know to be effective? How do they apply key concepts?
SCHM 6214 | 3 credits
Focuses on how to create sustainable supply chains that profitably yield high-quality, safe products without supply interruption while creating a net benefit for the employees, community, and the environment. Studies how companies measure environmental performance and use the data to motivate associates, suppliers, customers, policy makers, and the public. Also addresses the impacts of global sustainability frameworks and measures.
SCHM 6221 | 3 credits

Is the Graduate Certificate in Business Administration Right For You?

If you are a seasoned professional ready to take your next step, the answer is yes. The Graduate Certificate in Business Administration is designed for working professionals like you. Contact us at your convenience to discuss all the benefits of earning your Graduate Certificate in Business Administration. Now is the time to advance your career.