This combined major focuses on business, psychology, and the interface between the two disciplines. The scope and sequence of psychology courses provide students with a foundation in the interdisciplinary science of psychology, including statistics and research, social psychology, developmental psychology, cognition, and personality.

Business courses provide a foundation in accounting, innovation, marketing, management, and organizational behavior, with the opportunity to concentrate in a specific area of business. Students completing this program should be able to understand the relationships between these fields that pertain to explaining and addressing human behavior and business practices.

What is a Combined Major?

A combined major combines two majors in a way that allows a student to fulfill all requirements within the standard 8 academic semesters. For details, see the BS in Business Administration and Psychology program requirements.

This degree can be accomplished using either the four- or five-year co-op plan. There are also business concentrations and business minors to help you customize your unique Northeastern educational experience.

BS in Business Administration and Communication Studies Curriculum

The curriculum below is an abbreviated sample of the business administration academic requirements for the Business Administration and Psychology degree. Please refer to the program information in the Registrar’s Undergraduate Catalog for the full curriculum appropriate to your class year. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Required Courses

Complete one of the following introductory courses:

BUSN 1102. Personal Skill Development for Business. 1 Hour.

Offers first-year students in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business (DMSB) an opportunity to achieve a better understanding of themselves as students and as future professionals. Explores self-analysis, leadership traits and styles, diversity and cultural awareness, professionalism, emotional intelligence, and ethics. Encourages students to draw connections among classroom education, extracurricular activities, and practical experiences and to identify how each component fits into the pursuit of their individual goals.

PSYC 1000. Psychology at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Introduces students to the major and to the professional and academic resources available to students at Northeastern University. Introduces students to their faculty, advisors, and fellow students; educates students about the cooperative education program; familiarizes students with undergraduate research and technological resources; and introduces problem-solving and leadership skills, which students need to succeed in school and in their professional endeavors. Students who do not meet course prerequisites may seek permission of instructor.

Complete one of the following co-op preparation courses:

BUSN 1103. Professional Development for Business Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces students to the Cooperative Education Program and provides them with an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Offers students an opportunity to perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career choices. Students also have an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, professional behaviors, work culture, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and teaches them to use myNEU in the job-search and referral process. Presents co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Department of Cooperative Education and co-op employers.

EESC 2000. Professional Development for Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces students to the Cooperative Education Program and provides them with an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Offers students an opportunity to perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career choices. Students also have an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, professional behaviors, work culture, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and teaches them to use myNEU in the job-search and referral process. Presents co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Department of Cooperative Education and co-op employers.

Business Administration Requirements

ACCT 1201. Financial Accounting and Reporting. 4 Hours.

Covers the basic concepts underlying financial statements and the accounting principles followed in the preparation of the balance sheet, the income statement, and the statement of cash flows. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with accounting terminology and methods designed to enable them to interpret, analyze, and evaluate published corporate financial reports. Wherever appropriate, the course relates current economic, business, and global events to accounting issues. Analyzes how financial reporting concepts affect the behavior of investors, creditors, and other external users. Emphasizes the importance of ethics in financial reporting. Requires second-semester-freshman standing or above.

ACCT 2301. Managerial Accounting. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the development and use of information—especially financial information—for managerial decisions within the firm. Introduces managerial accounting concepts, analyses, and practices that support business decisions through class discussions, exercises, and case analysis. Topics include budgeting, cost management and behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costs for decision making, cost allocation issues, and performance evaluation. Emphasizes the importance of ethics.

ENTR 2301. Innovation!. 4 Hours.

Designed for students across the entire University who wish to learn about innovation—the creative process, the different types of innovation, how innovations are created, and how innovations can be transformed into commercial reality either as new products or new services and either in startups, existing corporations, and nonprofit entities. Offers students an opportunity to obtain the fundamental insight needed to understand the innovation process and to become a player in it.

FINA 2201. Financial Management. 4 Hours.

Designed to develop the financial skills and logical thought processes necessary to understand and discuss financial policy decisions in a global economy. Specific objectives include developing an understanding of the time value of money; using financial statements in decision making; and understanding the nature of financial markets, the cost of capital, valuation of stocks and bonds, management of short-term assets, short-term and long-term financing, capital markets, and multinational financial management. Addresses the impact of legal, social, technological, and ethical considerations on efficient economic outcomes. Requires a financial calculator and provides an opportunity to develop computer spreadsheet skills.

INTB 1203. International Business and Global Social Responsibility. 4 Hours.

Introduces the student to forces and issues confronted in our era of rapid globalization. Managers must understand forces from interconnected social, political, and economic national environments that affect their company’s operations. At the same time they need to draw on their ethical foundations to address and act on social responsibility imperatives across national borders.

MKTG 2201. Introduction to Marketing. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the role of marketing in business and society. Considers the planning, implementation, and evaluation of marketing efforts in consumer and business-to-business companies, in service and goods companies, and in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Also examines contemporary issues in marketing that can affect organizational success. A term project is used to enable students to apply their learning about the fundamentals of marketing.

ORGB 3201. Organizational Behavior. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the actions and behaviors of people in organizations. Uses case studies, videos, experiential exercises, lectures, and discussions to explore the effects of individual, interpersonal, group, organizational, and cross-cultural factors on human behavior. Topics include groups and teams, motivation, leadership, organizational change, organizational culture, structure, conflict resolution, and communication. Both the underlying theories and principles of these topics, as well as their practical applications and implications for organizations, are covered.

STRT 4501. Strategy in Action. 4 Hours.

Provides for the integration and application of administrative theory, knowledge, skills, and experiences for effective strategic performance in an organization. Offers students an opportunity to acquire a better understanding of the relevance and limitations of business and management concepts and techniques when making and implementing strategic decisions.

Complete one of the following:

MISM 2301. Management Information Systems. 4 Hours.

Explores how a wide range of enterprises around the world use information and information technology to create better-managed, more innovative, and successful organizations. The twenty-first-century enterprise runs on information, and every part of the business has been transformed by the use of information technology. Today’s business leaders, therefore, must have ready access to timely, accurate, and relevant information to manage effectively in the global economy.

SCHM 2301. Supply Chain and Operations Management. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the integrative management of business activities intrinsic to the smooth flow of goods or services, information, and financial transactions across firms from raw materials to the end customer. This collaborative approach creates competitive advantages for all members of a supply chain. Emphasizes the responsibilities of managers regarding decisions concerning the design, operation, and control of supply chains and operations. Considers customers, globalization, corporate strategy, resources, sustainability, ethics, and diversity. Topics covered include customer-centric management; supply chain and operations strategies; process structure and control; and supply, inventory, and quality management. Emphasizes the key role of information technology, logistics network design, supply chain relationships, and process evolution.

Example Psychology Courses

  • Statistics in Psychological Research
  • Social Psychology
  • Cognition
  • Personality
  • Developmental Psychology

Choose a Business Concentration

Accounting is a dynamic profession that requires people to possess sound technical knowledge, critical thinking skills, superior interpersonal skills, and the ability to communicate effectively.

Experiential Learning

A cooperative education experience, or Co-op, is the cornerstone experiential learning opportunity for D’Amore-McKim students.

Related Programs

Business Combined Majors

Get your business degree while obtaining a foundation in the interdisciplinary science of psychology, including statistics and research, social psychology, developmental psychology, cognition, and personality.

Students can complete business major requirements while also focusing on the conceptual and practical computer science skills that will enable them to contribute to ensuring the reliability and security of cyberspace.

Business Minors

The minor in emerging markets introduces students to the challenges and opportunities that face companies in countries that are rapidly developing into more developed world economies.