Is quiet quitting real, or just “new packaging for old problems?” Northeastern's Jamie Ladge, of the D'Amore-McKim School of Business, weighs in.

Abortion-rights activists demonstrate against the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade that established a constitutional right to abortion, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Childcare is not a family issue, it is a business issue. It affects how we work, when we work and for many, why we work. Moving forward, employer-provided child care could also influence where we work. It is up to businesses to think creatively about ways to build the childcare infrastructure we need to help working parents keep working for their families, and the economy as a whole.

The pandemic, along with the war in Ukraine, caused supply chain issues that led to some ingredients and packaging materials becoming less available. How do we prevent it from happening again? Northeastern faculty weigh in.

The baby formula shortage has left families scrambling to feed their children. Northeastern faculty explain why breastfeeding—or buying breast milk—isn't necessarily an easy solution. Photo by Paul Hennessy/Getty Images

Jamie Ladge highlights the urgency of widely available child care to including working parents, especially mothers, in the workforce post-pandemic.

President Biden's infrastructure plan includes child care provisions, which Northeastern ‘shecession' researchers say are essential for welcoming women back to the workforce.

Jamie Ladge's co-authored study examines systemic inequities in the healthcare field and finds that a “hero” status isn't what medical professionals want. Photo: Brian Ach/AP Images for NYC Healthcare Heroes.

There can be no perfect model for working motherhood, Jamie Ladge points out in her new book, because each case is unique to the circumstances of the parents and their children.

Here's what two Northeastern students found.