supply chain

President Joe Biden celebrated Thursday a tentative labor agreement that averted a strike of U.S. freight trains. But the crisis has not yet been averted, warns Nada Sanders, distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern.

A new supply of baby formula will bring much-needed relief to families across the country. While it's not a quick solution, Nada Sanders of Northeastern says, it's a great first step.

The pandemic, along with the war in Ukraine, caused supply chain issues that led to some ingredients and packaging materials becoming less available. How do we prevent it from happening again? Northeastern faculty weigh in.

Surging oil and gas prices will spill over into the supply chains for just about everything that has to be carted around the world, says Nada Sanders, university distinguished professor of supply-chain management at Northeastern. In the case of bananas—which have a “very long” footprint—the story is a complicated one.

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine extends into its fourth week, its effect on global supply chains—already beleaguered by the COVID-19 pandemic—is only just beginning. “This is going to have a significant impact,” says Nada Sanders, distinguished professor of supply-chain management at Northeastern. “I'm extremely concerned.”

A record volume of import cargo is anticipated for the Port of Los Angeles this year, but relief for overburdened supply chains may be on the horizon. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes