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Rebrands are rare, says Paul Fombelle, who worked at one of the world's biggest advertising agencies before teaching marketing at Northeastern. For the franchise most recently known as the Washington Football Team, a new name and logo won't matter as much as the play on the field, he says.

Artists signing over the publishing rights to their songs for a pretty penny isn't new. But the latest trend is driven by a few important factors, say Northeastern professors with deep knowledge of the music industry.

Leveraging its broad network of industry partners, Northeastern will host more than 50 students on its Boston campus this summer, where they'll have access to experiential learning opportunities including paid internships at a number of area organizations.

The COVID-19 pandemic struck one year after Glen Giovanucci (DMSB'83) became chief executive officer of G-Form, a maker of protective sports gear. His company survived the crisis because he was able to lean on the leadership skills he learned from playing ice hockey at Northeastern.

From freelance journalism to online merchandising, Audrey Lang (DMSB'15) takes a multifaceted approach to content creation. Lang, who studied business administration at D'Amore-McKim, shares tips and advice in this episode of “What It Takes” for freelancers working around the world.

Sports drinks were high in sugar and low in nutrition–until Northeastern alumnus Lamar Letts (DMSB'17) invented Hylux. The high school track star, sidelined by the discovery of a serious illness, created the beverage when he was ready to return to the gym. Now, he's the youngest CEO to have a product on Walmart.com.

The Dean's Corner series provides a first-person, informative narrative of exciting and important happenings at Northeastern University's D'Amore-McKim School of Business. In this installment from Interim Dean Emery Trahan, he celebrates the D'Amore-McKim faculty community for their outstanding research contributions during another difficult year.

‘Succession is the No. 1 issue that haunts family businesses,' says Kimberly A. Eddleston, Schulze distinguished professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at Northeastern. HBO.

Self-scanners—like this one at an Amazon Go Grocery in Seattle—are part of a larger trend that is overhauling the U.S. job market. Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images

By marrying financial services with cutting-edge technology, fintech is meant to inspire the development of new companies by people and communities that have been shut out of the traditional financial system. But the industry is falling woefully short in creating opportunities for women, according to a global survey managed by Susanne Hannestad, a Northeastern graduate. Photo by Alyssa Stone/Northeastern University