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Since Elon Musk purchased Twitter for $44 billion on Oct. 27, speculation about how the short-form text-based platform will change has run wild.
Will Musk work to curb hate speech and misinformation on the platform? Will he charge users a subscription fee? Will there be layoffs? And, perhaps most saliently, will Twitter survive the change-of-hands against the backdrop of years of unprofitability?

Protests sparked by the death of a 22-year old Kurdish woman and roaring across Iran for more than a week indicate the depth of grievances Iranians have against the Islamist regime, Northeastern University's experts say, but it is difficult to predict whether they will lead to any change in the country and in the state of women's rights.

Is quiet quitting real, or just “new packaging for old problems?” Northeastern's Jamie Ladge, of the D'Amore-McKim School of Business, weighs in.

Quiet quitting is all the buzz on social media. Originating from Tik Tok creator @zaidleppelin, it's made the rounds on every platform from Tik Tok to LinkedIn. We sat down with Associate Teaching Professor Curtis Odom EdD to understand the nuances of this new workplace phenomenon.

They may seem like strange bedfellows, but TikTok — thanks to the power of #BookTok — is helping books get in vogue for Generation Z.

Northeastern airlines industry expert Ravi Sarathy says JetBlue's acquisition of Spirit Airlines will probably result in higher fares for consumers, as the low-cost carrier Spirit disappears in the planned $3.8 billion purchase.

Let's not make things worse. As a summary, organizations and marketers love to talk about the benefits of our products and the customers who benefit from our products. But there are always consequences to products. Sometimes they are substantial, and sometimes they affect some groups more than others.

Price disruptions are sure to have impacts on consumer behavior. Market-watchers have suggested that an “inflationary psychology” is starting to set in. Northeastern experts break down what that means.

A new supply of baby formula will bring much-needed relief to families across the country. While it's not a quick solution, Nada Sanders of Northeastern says, it's a great first step.

The baby formula shortage has left families scrambling to feed their children. Northeastern faculty explain why breastfeeding—or buying breast milk—isn't necessarily an easy solution. Photo by Paul Hennessy/Getty Images